Does Some of Your Email Belong in Evernote? 4 Ways to Get It There

You have lots of information that you need to keep for documentation purposes.

You know…just in case. The kind of information that you hope never comes up again, like that parent who was mad one day and filed a complaint with the state. Or the special education meeting that went south. You know what I mean.

Much of this information arrives via email, and even if it doesn’t, it’s very easy to use email to get it into your Evernote account, where it becomes a magical, searchable cloud of potential usefulness, instead of a pile labeled “to file” that never gets filed.

Here are 4 ways to get information into Evernote using its ability to accept email.

To get started, find your Evernote email address. Look in Account Settings (this has different names in various Evernote apps, but on the web you’ll see it here). It’ll be something like [email protected]

Add this to your address book with a simple name like “Evernote” or even “EN” and you’re off to the races.

BCC Evernote on an Email You’re Sending

Use when: You’re emailing someone, and you want to make sure you have a copy for future reference, even if it gets deleted from your email or becomes hard to find.

Make sure you: Use BCC, not CC, or else the other person will wonder why you’re sending a confidential message to someone else.

Forward an Email to Evernote

Use when: You’ve received something that you want to keep…and it doesn’t belong in your inbox forever.

Make sure you: Clearly identify any action items, e.g. with a Reminder in Evernote.

Tip: You can make sure a reminder is added to a new note by adding ! to the end of the subject line. For example, an email with the subject “Pick up testing packet at district HQ !” will become a new note with that title, minus the exclamation point, and with a reminder. Add a due date like !tomorrow to set the reminder to a specific date.

Use Rules to Forward Messages to Evernote

Use when: You need to document everything from (or to) a specific person.

In your email program, you can set up rules to automatically forward messages to Evernote based on specific criteria.

For example, let’s say you have a certain parent who emails you daily with, shall we say, unreasonable messages, and you want to make sure you’re covered, without spending all day printing and filing.

Go into your email program (Gmail, Outlook, or whatever you use), and set up a rule (or filter) to automatically forward messages from that person to your Evernote email address. That way, everything is documented effortlessly.

Make sure you: BCC Evernote on your replies (unless you set a rule to run on outgoing messages too, which is a bit trickier).

Have Reports Emailed Directly to Evernote

Use when: You get automated reports sent from various data systems, such as your state or district, or web-based apps your school uses.

If you can, change the email address to which these reports are sent, so they go straight to your Evernote account and bypass your email inbox.

Make sure you: Check your Evernote inbox (or default notebook) frequently, in case other important notifications are sent to you via email.

Tip: If you can’t change the email address these reports are sent to, use a rule as I described above.

Get Started with Evernote for Free

If you don’t have an Evernote account, click here to get started. You can get a free month of Premium (normally $5.99) when you use this link to join, and additional months when you invite a colleague.

Learn More in High Performance Habits

Our most recent webinar on Evernote is now available on-demand in High Performance Habits:
HPH-Evernote-2015-06-30-Webinar-title

In this webinar, you’ll learn how Evernote can be an essential part of your productivity toolkit, dramatically reducing the time and effort it takes to manage documentation and critical emails.

We’ll explore:

  • The major change Evernote is making on July 6, and how you can be prepared for it
  • The key leadership document every administrator needs, and why Evernote is the best place to keep it
  • How to keep your documentation organized with almost zero effort, so you can find exactly what you need in seconds
  • How Evernote can fit into your instructional leadership workflow, for both walkthroughs and formal observations
  • An undocumented but powerful trick for updating existing notes with new information via email

The High Performance Habits program includes the webinar recording as well as:

  • Our full 6-part Going Digital with Evernote course AND
  • Powerful Web Apps for High-Performance Information Flow, which shows you how to integrate Evernote with ToDoist and Google Calendar
  • All of our other personal productivity & effectiveness content to help you maximize your impact on student learning

» Learn More

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Why Instructional Leaders Belong In Classrooms

genchi-genbutsu

Where do leaders belong?

We’re often needed in the office, but we like to be “visible.” We like to be in hallways, in dropoff and pickup zones, in lunchrooms and at recess.

How do we stack up to leaders in other industries in this regard?

At Toyota, there’s a concept called Genchi Genbutsu, which conveys the idea of going to the gemba, or the place where the actual work is done, and seeing that work firsthand.

Leaders who don’t spend time in the gemba won’t have the information they need to make decisions, solve problems, and support employees effectively.

As leaders, we need to spend our time where the work is done. We need to understand that work deeply, so we can provide the kind of leadership the organization needs.

Leadership involves making decisions—not the decisions of a distant executive concerned only with numbers, but the decisions of a supportive, on-the-ground manager who understands what’s happening on the front lines, and is concerned first and foremost with the success of the people there in the gemba.

As instructional leaders, that means we need to be in classrooms. Is there any doubt or debate about this?

I know I’m not alone in this belief, because more than 3,200 people in 50 countries have joined the 21-Day Instructional Leadership Challenge, which is all about making a habit of being in classrooms.

Documenting What Happens in the Gemba

Being in classrooms has a number of benefits, one of which is the chance to notes and provide written feedback to teachers.

Where should you keep those notes? If you use a comprehensive instructional leadership platform like TeachBoost, that’s a good place.

If not, you’ll probably want to save your notes in Evernote.

Get Started with Evernote for Free

If you don’t have an Evernote account, click here to get started. You can get a free month of Premium (normally $5.99) when you use this link to join, and additional months when you invite a colleague.

Learn More in High Performance Habits

Our most recent webinar on Evernote is now available on-demand in High Performance Habits:
HPH-Evernote-2015-06-30-Webinar-title

In this webinar, you’ll learn how Evernote can be an essential part of your productivity toolkit, dramatically reducing the time and effort it takes to manage documentation and critical emails.

We’ll explore:

  • The major change Evernote is making on July 6, and how you can be prepared for it
  • The key leadership document every administrator needs, and why Evernote is the best place to keep it
  • How to keep your documentation organized with almost zero effort, so you can find exactly what you need in seconds
  • How Evernote can fit into your instructional leadership workflow, for both walkthroughs and formal observations
  • An undocumented but powerful trick for updating existing notes with new information via email

The High Performance Habits program includes the webinar recording as well as:

  • Our full 6-part Going Digital with Evernote course AND
  • Powerful Web Apps for High-Performance Information Flow, which shows you how to integrate Evernote with ToDoist and Google Calendar
  • All of our other personal productivity & effectiveness content to help you maximize your impact on student learning

» Learn More

highperf_habits_banner_1200_400